WEST AFRICA REGIONAL COOPERATIVES WORKSHOP ON CROSS BORDER TRADE AND MARKET ACCESS








(ACCRA, 26 – 28 JULY 2004)









PROCESS ANALYSIS








The Pan African Organization for Sustainable Development (POSDEV)

EO37 ANEVON COURT

C15 LASHIBI

ACCRA



Tel: 022 404517/18










TABLE OF CONTENTS


ACRONYMS

3

i.

INTRODUCTION

5



II.



STATE OF CROSS BORDER TRADE IN WEST AFRICA


9

III.

PROCESS FOR FACILITATION OF CROSS BORDER TRADE

10

IV.

OUTCOMES – MEASURES FOR ENHANCING CROSS BORDER BUSINESS

12



    1. TOWARDS THE EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ECOWAS LEGAL AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK ON FREE MOVEMENT OF PERSONS AND GOODS WITHIN THE WEST AFRICAN SUB-REGION.


12


    1. NETWORKING- A PRACTICAL AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH FOR ADDRESSING CONSTRAINTS TO CROSS-BORDER BUSINESS

19



    1. DEVELOPING A PRAGMATIC FRAMEWORK FOR BUILDING ALLIANCES, NETWORKS, ADVOCACY PLANS AND MOVEMENTS TO FACILITATE INTEGRATION AND CROSS BORDER


25




    1. A PROCESS FOR TRANSFERRING RESOURCES TO AN EXCHANGE -- THE AFRICAN INTER CO-OPERATIVE COMMODITY EXCHANGE (IACCE)



29

V.


IMMEDIATE FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS - MEETING OF LEADERS OF NATIONAL COOPERATIVES AND THE INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE ALLIANCE

33

VI.


POST WORKSHOP ANALYSIS


35

VII.

ANNEXES

  1. ECOWAS PROTOCOLS

  2. DAKAR, DECEMBER 2003, ACTION PLAN

  3. PARTICIPANTS LIST

  4. DAKAR, DECEMBER 2003 REPORT



36

39


41

44








ACRONYMS


ACBB:


Association des Commercants de Betail de Bittou (Assocaition of traders of Livestock Products of Bittou-Burkina Faso)

ADB:

African Development Bank

AICCE:

African Inter Cooperative Commodity Exchange

AREN:

Association pour la Redynmamisation de l’Elevage au Niger (Association for Revitalization of Livestock Production in Niger) – Niger

ASPMY:



Association Professionnelle des Maraichers de Yatenga (Association of Vegetable Producersof Yantenga (Burkina Faso)

BAIC:



Bourse Inter-Africaine des Cooperatives (African Inter-Cooperative Commodity Exchange)

BOAD:


Banque Ouest Africaine de Developpement(West African Development Bank

CBIMS:

Computerised Business Information Management System

CILSS:


Comite Inter Etats de Lutte Contre la Secheresse dans le Sahel/Inter-State Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel

CCG:

Cooperative Council of Ghana

CLUSA:

Cooperative League of United States of America

CNC:

Cadre National de Concertation (National Consultative Board

CNOP:

Conseil National des Organizations Paysannes de Guinee( Guinee National Council of farmers’ Organizations

COMOESAM:

Coordination des Operateurs Economiques du Secteur Agroalimentaire du Mali (Coordination of Agro-foods Economic Operators of Mali)

CSO:

Civil Society Organization

ECO:

Proposed new currency for West African countries

ECOWAS:


Economic Community of West Africa States

ETLS:

ECOWAS Trade Liberasation Scheme

GCMA:

Ghana Cooperative Marketing Association

ICA/ROWA:

International Cooperative Alliance for Africa Regional Office for West Africa

ICA:


International Cooperative Alliance

ISTRG:


Inter-States Transit Road for Goods

NEPAD:


New Partnership for Africa’s Development

NGOs:

Non-Governmental Organization

OHADA:

Organization pour l’harmonisation du Droit des Affaires en Africa (Organization for Harmonization of Business Law in Africa).

PSI:

President’s Special Initiative (Ghana

POSDEV:

Pan African Organization for Sustainable Development

ROPPA



Reseau des Organisations Paysannes et des Producteurs Agricoles de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (ROPPA).

SOGEMAF:


Societe de Gestion du Marche Frontalier (Border Market Management Company

UEMOA:

Union Economique Monétaire de l’Ouest Afrique (West Africa Economic Monetary Union)

WAEMU:

West Africa Economic Monetary Union

WAMI:

West Africa Monetary Institute





I. INTRODUCTION


The West Africa Regional Workshop on Cross Border Trade and Market Access was held at the Coconut Grove Regency Hotel in Accra-Ghana from the 26th to 28th July 2004. Fifty-four participants from twelve West African countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Cote d’Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, and Togo took part in the process (Participant list annex 3). Participants were selected from:


Member-Owned Small Businesses







Background


The workshop was a third in a series initiated by the West Africa Regional Office of the International Cooperative Alliance in 1998. The process started with a study conducted in five West African Countries - Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Cote d’Ivoire and Senegal to examine the state of trade among cooperatives and identify possible strategies for the promotion of this trade.


The first workshop drew participants from West, Southern, and East Africa. Essentially, It was at this gathering that cooperatives agreed to set up an African Commodity Exchange. The second workshop took place in Dakar, Senegal in December 2003 and regrouped representatives of cooperatives from six West African countries with the objective of validating the additional feasibility studies conducted in Ghana, Mali, Niger and Nigeria. The establishment of an African Inter-Cooperative Commodity Exchange (AICCE)waswa was unanimously validated here by cooperatives and other small business representatives as being critical for the integration of markets in the region. The AICCE is an initiative by the West Africa Office of the International Cooperative Alliance.


The proposed inter-cooperative commodity exchange has the main objective of promoting the commercialisation of produce among and by cooperative organizations affiliated to ICA in the West-Africa sub-region, and between West Africa and other sub-regions. The commodity exchange would facilitate regional integration by promoting trade information exchange; assisting with the institutional development of Cooperatives as well as promote networking among cooperatives and other business.


The major stakeholders in the AICCE are cooperatives, small and medium enterprises; development institutions, banks, financial institutions, chambers of Commerce and Industry.


In Eastern and Southern Africa negotiations are underway to create a similar initiative. It is anticipated that the two initiatives could merge eventually into a common Inter-Cooperative Exchange for the whole of Africa.


Workshop Framework

The meeting had the theme: “Co-operatives Facilitation of Regional Integration in Africa” with broad objectives of developing pragmatic strategies to facilitate regional market access and intra-regional trade in West Africa through the establishment of an “African Inter-Co-operatives Commodity Exchange” (AICCE) and thereby promoting regional integration. The specific objective was to provide participants with relevant information on the state of trade within the sub-region and to share experiences and come up with proposals aimed at reducing the obstacles identified.


Participants were tasked to discuss the existing legal and regulatory framework of Economic Community of West Africa States (ECOWAS1) as regards the movement of people and goods and to suggest specific areas for possible review and improvement. They were also charged with examining current constraints and problems related to cross border business and to suggest practical measures to address them. Recommendations were also sought for practical strategies to build a strong advocacy alliance as well as develop a framework for networking to facilitate cross border business. Earlier proposals for the establishment of the AICCE were also to be examined and finalized.


It was expected that at the end of the meeting participants will be well informed; will have developed a pragmatic action plan to improve cross border business with stakeholder roles and responsibilities as well as commitments clearly defined. In addition a framework and practical strategies for organizing and building networks and alliances for strong advocacy for an enabling environment for cross border business will be defined as well as clear proposals for the establishment of AICCE and the location of its headquarters or home office.



The strategic approach of organizers:








The choice of Ghana as a location for the workshop was strategic, in view of previous discussions among the cooperatives communities of West Africa to have the headquarters of the proposed African Inter-Cooperatives Commodity Exchange (AICCE) in Accra.


It was imperative to get the Government Ministers concerned with issues of, food and agriculture, trade, human resource development, security and regional cooperation to participate in the workshop in order to inform participants from the sub-region about the policy framework for effective trade among citizens of the sub-region as well as the prospects for economic growth and stability. Their deliveries were aimed at giving participants a level of comfort on the current political, economic and security status of Ghana. Present at the opening ceremony on the first day of the workshop were:



In all their addresses, the Ministers pledged to give the necessary support to the Cooperative Council of Ghana, CLUSA and the ICA-West Africa Regional Office to ensure the achievement of successful cross border trade in West Africa. They urged participants to consider Ghana for the head office of the AICCE given her central and strategic location within the sub-region, the democratic and constitutional rule, the prevalence of good governance, rule of law, sound economic situation, easy access to information technology and easy access to the country by land, air and sea.


They cited examples of on-going reforms in the sub-region which are aimed at enhancing the regional integration process as follows:



The Minister of Regional Cooperation and NEPAD who gave the keynote address reaffirmed his Ministry’s commitment to achieving effective trade within West Africa. He asked cooperatives’ representatives to make their voices heard by policy-makers. He confirmed that in Ghana contacts had started with other countries such as Niger, Benin and Burkina Faso on the speedy Implementation of ECOWAS Protocols.


Workshop Structure


The structure of the workshop was designed by the organizers to bring out each participant’s input so as to promote ownership of the agreed outcomes and action-plans and facilitate the formation of advocacy networks. The format for proceedings were: Presentations; Group work; Focused discussions on presentations; Recommended Practical solutions and strategies to address issues raised; Plenary sessions led by facilitator (Mr Joe Appiah – Pentax Management Consult; Analysis and summary of output/outcomes by facilitator; Validation of outputs and outcomes by all in a plenary session.


II. STATE OF CROSS BORDER TRADE IN WEST AFRICA


Co-operatives and other member-owned group businesses are the largest number of civil society organizations in Africa, however these constituencies do not have a formal voice in the decision making processes of regional inter-state organizations such as ECOWAS. At the governmental level programmes are being developed and implemented to promote intra-Africa trade as well as closer integration of the peoples of the region, however, Civil Society is not represented at these fora nor do they make any meaningful input. Their participation is on an adhoc basis and often very fragmented.


Within the ECOWAS structure, there is no formalization of Civil Society participation in the consultation of Ministers and Heads of State. To date no NGO or CSO has been accorded an observer status with ECOWAS. Decisions are taken without consulting the people who will bear the possible negative effect from the -application or non-application of a policy.


In view of this, it can be said that the slow pace towards the achievement of regional integration and cohesion within the African economic blocs could also be attributed to the non-participation of cooperatives and other small economic interest groups in the policy making environment. In order to gain voice, these groups need to develop their position as players in the regional economy.


At present countries are not benefiting fully from the advantages of cross-border trade like enhanced access to world markets, global finance and technology. They do not benefit from exposure to global competition because of their inability to expand to external markets within their region. As a result, countries do not have protection against the risks of full globalization, neither do they benefit from nor acquire the capacity to establish vibrant institutional arrangements for international economic interactions. This is all because the region has not been able to capitalize on the critical mass of informal businesses like cooperatives, which constitute the majority of enterprises.


These obstacles are such that although the sub-region has the means to feed itself from internal food production, it is increasingly extrovert considering the rising import of cereals (rice, maize, wheat), Vegetables (onions, potatoes) from Asia, America, and Europe. It is indeed easier to import from Asia than from the West Africa sub-region


Various Protocols on free movement of persons and goods have been signed and ratified by member states of ECOWAS but implementation has not progressed as expected. The protocol on the ECOWAS Trade Liberalization Scheme which is supposed to encourage and facilitate intra-regional trade, is not being implemented, thus Cooperatives and other small businesses within the sub-region encounter difficulties in doing business even among themselves and across borders. This has deprived the sub-region of much needed markets and employment generation.


Other major constraints to sub-regional trade are identified as follows:




.



The Cooperatives Environment


In most African Countries, laws on co-operatives and other member-owned businesses and their application have not been adjusted to allow for free operation in the liberalized market. As a result cooperatives have been forced to operate in the informal sector. After independence in Ghana, for example, the heavy-handed intervention of government in cooperatives brought about the application of a Decree (Cooperative Society Decree of 1968), which retained much of the governmental control features of the Registrar system that characterized the co-operative law during the colonial era. This continues to be the co-operative law of Ghana after thirty-five years.


Also in Ghana, there are about 11,000 registered societies but fewer than 1,000 were active or marginally active in 2003. This low level of activity has numerous causes: the excessive powers of the Registrar’s office; the cumbersome nature of the registration process; inadequate technical and financial support.


The use of cooperatives for political objectives has compounded these problems. For example, in 1975 the government of Ghana initiated a national program to establish consumer co-operatives across the country. These co-operatives were formed from the top down and operated more like subsidized, parastatal organizations than member-owned and controlled businesses. As subsidies dried up, most of these co-operatives were not able to make the transition to self-supporting businesses, and have all but disappeared.




  1. PROCESS FOR FACILITATION OF CROSS BORDER TRADE


It is to consolidate efforts initiated in facilitating trade and regional integration that the Cooperative League of the USA (CLUSA) in collaboration with the Cooperative Council of Ghana (CCG), the Pan African Organization for Sustainable Development (POSDEV)), and the Inter-States Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel (CILSS) are supporting the International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) to push forward the momentum already established through a multi-pronged approach. This started with a three-day workshop aimed at bringing out practical solutions to problems identified; lay the basis for an effective network to lobby national governments and the ECOWAS Secretariat as well as initiate steps for the establishment of the African Inter-Cooperatives Commodity Exchange (AICCE).


The process aims at facilitating the adoption of measures and strategies that make the sub-regional environment more appropriate for intra African commerce and thereby address the issues of wealth creation, economic growth and regional integration.




Pre-Workshop Activities


The workshop was preceded by the commissioning of 3 case studies on cooperative and small private businesses in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. Organisations studied were:


ASPMY: Association Professionnelle des Maraîchers du Yatenga (Association of

Vegetable Producers of Yatenga)- Bittou - Burkina Faso

ACBB: Association des Commerçants de Bétail de Bittou (Association of Traders of Livestock Products - Burkina Faso.

SOGEMAF: Société de Gestion du Marché Frontalier (Border Market Management

Company) – Mali.

CONOESAM : Coordination des Opérateurs Economiques du Secteur Agroalimentaire du Mali (Coordination of Agri- foods Economic Operators) – Mali.

Abbas SARKIN ABZIN (Private Operator) – Niger.

AREN : Association pour la Redynamisation de l’ Elevage au Niger (Association for

revitalization of Livestock Production in Niger) - Niger.


The studies revealed a wide range of problems common to small businesses, outside the mainstream financial logistical and technical bottlenecks already encountered by the small economic operators.


Problems identified by the studies are: harassment by security agents within and outside country borders (police and customs); innumerable Non-tariff barriers3 and poor infrastructure: various check points used to unlawfully take money from the citizens as well as cause unnecessary delays.


Roadblocks and checkpoints on all the West Africa international highways are positioned in an uncoordinated with each security agency operating separate checkpoints. For example in Ghana 61 checkpoints were identified on the Ouagadougou – Tamale - Accra road during the study by CILSS. Another drawback is convertibility and volatility of certain currencies in the sub-region.


Among solutions proposed in the studies are:




IV. OUTCOMES OF WORKSHOP – MEASURES FOR ENHANCING CROSS BORDER TRADE


A. TOWARDS THE EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ECOWAS LEGAL AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK ON FREE MOVEMENT OF PERSONS AND GOODS WITHIN THE WEST AFRICA SUB-REGION



Mr Adou Koman of the Trade Department in the ECOWAS Secretariat in Abuja, Nigeria presented on the existing ECOWAS protocols relating to the free movement of persons and goods. This provided participants with an insight into the legal and regulatory framework governing trade in the ECOWAS region. Mr Stephen Oppong of the Ministry of Regional Cooperation and NEPAD in Ghana, outlined the challenges faced in the implementation of ECOWAS Trade protocols viz. the Protocol on free movement of goods and services referred to as the ECOWAS Trade Liberalisation Scheme (ETLS); and the Inter-State Road Transit convention.


ECOWAS was created to promote co-operation and integration with the view of raising the standard of living of citizens and contribute to the development of the African Continent. The economic community is therefore charged with the creation of a condusive environment for trade through development of programmes that facilitate free movement of persons, goods and services, the development of infrastructure and the harmonization of trade and telecommunication instruments.

Aware of the difficulties encountered in the implementation of the free movement of persons and goods, the Heads of States and Governments have:





Various protocols have been signed and ratified (see Annex 1) to consolidate cross-border trade and investment. However, in spite of all the laudable intentions, the integration process has been slow. Trade among ECOWAS States currently represents less than 11% of their total external trade of ECOWAS States with the rest of the world.


Despite the fact that the ECOWAS Trade Liberalisation Scheme (ETLS) aims at removing all tariff and non-tariff barriers to intra-regional trade, there are still implementation setbacks For example, where a member state places a ban on commodities of ECOWAS origin with the added complications of numerous roadblocks and checkpoints on international highways.


Another trade related ECOWAS Protocol is the Inter-State Road Transit convention (ISRT), which allows the transportation of goods by road from one Member State to another through one or more Member States free of duties, taxes and restrictions while in transit. The goods are accompanied by a set of customs documents and are not to be off-loaded or transferred while in transit.


To enhance the implementation of these protocols, the Ghana Government has adopted a process of bilateral talks with La Cote d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso.


Measures that are required of all Ministries in charge of Regional Cooperation and Trade to improve implementation include:




Workshop participants successfully indentified challenges and recommendations and adopted a Plan of Action (below) for the improvement of ECOWAS protocols implementation. They noted that it was imperative for civil society groups to support and challenge national governments to facilitate the removal of existing tariff and non-tariff barriers 5to trade, since they encourage smuggling6 and other unorthodox trading activities. All stakeholders are to unite their efforts and lobby their governments to implement all ratified and signed ECOWAS protocols on free movement of goods and services in order to allow social and economic development of the people in the sub-region.


These efforts will undoubtedly require concerted coordinated action at all national levels by cooperatives, traders, civil society groups and governments since measures will not be effective if protocols are implemented by a member state and not its neighbour.


Even though participants identified responsibility areas and timeframes, specific activities to achieve those results were not clearly marked out owing to time constraints. An annex has been added to this report further detailing specific activities and resources required and the specific role of participants at this workshop.




Challenges/Problems identified.

Recommended Solutions

Responsibility

Time Frame

Means of Verification

Lack of knowledge of texts by stakeholders

Education on the protocol should be done at all levels of our education system, the media and the general public in both French and English languages.

Various Governments in each of the countries -Departments of Education, Regional Cooperation

With effect from next academic year

2005/2006

Report from the follow-up committee members and ICA-Regional Office

Absence of training programmes to build technical skills and deepen awareness. Weak skills and knowledge in export techniques.

Training and Sensitization of all stakeholders

CLUSA/ICA/ECOWAS in conjunction with each country

Effective September, 2004

Valuation and Monitoring Report

Absence of sanctions against officials or countries, which violate the protocol.


Adoption of legal provisions 7of ECOWAS by all member states. All members States should sign and ratify the Protocol. Civil society and pressure groups to lobby the government to adhere to ECOWAS protocols.

ECOWAS Secretariat’

CSOS

By January 2005

Through the ECOWAS Executive Secretary’s mid-year and Annual Report – ICA should request for it

Lack of recognized body that will arbitrate and sanction violators of the protocols.









Establishment by ECOWAS of an Arbitration Committee in all member states with the power to sanction violators. Economic embargos, for example could be imposed.

Follow-up committee in conjunction with ICA should get report to relevant ministries in each country and invite proposals for the ECOWAS secretariat.



January, 2005

ECOWAS council of Minister’s Reports






Too many road barriers/checkpoints


Removal of unimportant barriers (unofficial and non-coordinated barriers and checkpoints) and adopt common barriers (2barriers).

Member states of ECOWAS

Immediate effect

Feedback to ICA by members/stakeholders.

Lack of awareness of ECOWAS programs and workshop conclusions.

Involvement of the private and public mass media in the dissemination programmes and conclusions of ECOWAS workshops


CLUSA/ICA ECOWAS, Civil Society Organisations, NGO’s, Representatives of each country in the committee for follow-up

Jan, 2005

Various reports on implementation of Action

Lack of political will to implement protocol

Establishment of supervisory units in each country for the application of the protocol

ECOWAS

January, 2005

ECOWAS’ Annual Report

Dishonesty of some drivers,

Effect of xenophobia,

Corruption.

Ethical behaviour should be publicly commended and unethical behaviour publicly sanctioned (by exposing state agents that take bribes or extort money from traders)

NGO’s/Civil Society Organisations/Advocacy Groups/Independent media

With Immediate Effect

Report from various organisations, especially NGOs, CSOs and Media.

Lack of knowledge of the protocols on the part of individuals and agencies responsible for implementing and enforcing them.

Improvement of working conditions by organizing seminars and workshop for stakeholders in Protocol implementation.





Various ECOWAS member states

Member States 2006 Budgets

Follow-up, Committee report

Lack of knowledge of texts by

Stakeholders






Protocols should be reduced into very simple language and taught in the public schools, and the training institutions of law enforcement agencies.

ECOWAS -Education ministries

Next Academic Year 2005/2006

ECOWAS Report

Ill informed population for whom the texts are made

Protocols should be made into simple handouts and given to members of associations or cooperatives who trade across borders.



ECOWAS Secretariat to ensure that it is done.

Jan 2006

ECOWAS/ICA Report

Lack of political will to implement protocols.

Adaptation of national regulations to the legal provisions of ECOWAS



Member States- Ministries of Justice and Regional Cooperation

Year 2005

ICA/Follow-up Committee 8Reports

Violation of texts by the states or by the authorities

ECOWAS Secretariat to establish a committee, which ensures the imposition of fines for each country, which infringes on the ECOWAS provisions and develop, appropriate sanctions.

Member states/NGOs/Civil Society/ICA follow-up committee should make proposals to ECOWAS Head of States

Year 2005

ECOWAS Report

Inequalities with regard to level of production, competitiveness and cost of production

The establishment of formal discussion committees to address these issues.

Member states-Department of Agric, fishery, regional cooperation

Immediately

ICA/Follow-up Committee Report

Unfavourable economic and institutional environment

Involve NGOs, CSOs and cooperatives in decision-making

All Ministries of Government.

Immediately

ICA/Follow-up Committee Report

Lack of follow-up decisions taken in workshops.

Inform the ECOWAS authorities of the final communiqué of these workshops and set up a follow-up committee (time limit: 3 months)

ICA/CLUSA/Member States through relevant ministries

Immediately

ICA/Follow-up Committee Report

Harassment at borders and frontiers.

Common system for travel formalities.

Member states-Ministries of Interior, Cooperation and Transport

Already Being Implemented

Travel and transport documents known to all in ECOWAS countries

Protection of goods

Establishment of an effective control system on the movement of people and goods.

ECOWAS, States, Economic operators, cooperatives, farmers organisations

1 Year

Evaluation report

B. NETWORKING- A PRACTICAL AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH FOR ADDRESSING CONSTRAINTS TO CROSS-BORDER BUSINESS


Deacon Samson Olalere of the Cooperative Development Research Action Centre (CODERAC), Nigeria and Dramane Coulibaly, Head of Food Security at CILSS gave different perspectives to the constraints and problems related to Cross Border Trade. The first gave a global perspective on the issue whilst the second had a more practical approach given the hands-on operational experiences of CILSS in the development of local markets for agrifood products in West Africa and Chad.


The objectives of the CILSS programme are to consolidate and reinforce existing infrastructure and equipment; to improve the management and organizational capacity of economic operators with the long term goal of networking markets. This will eventually lead to a number of cross border connected markets that encourage intra and inter state trade in cattle and agro products.


Activities undertaken include the rehabilitation of certain cattle markets in Burkina Faso, strengthening of the capacities of economic operators of the countries concerned, establishment of a computerized information system for the Bittou, Niangoloko and Sikasso markets and the development of holiday cottages in 5 countries.


Inadequate training of small traders and cooperatives9; continued marginalization of local agrifood products on national and regional markets were some of the problems identified. Some of these problems arise mostly from great disparities between national policies and an unsuitable economic and institutional environment.


Additional setbacks identified by participants were:

 

Identified solutions to these constraints are among others: networking and alliance building. There is need for regional information resource centres where member states and groups can share ideas, innovations and strategies.


Other solutions include the creation of a regional advocacy group to lobby governments at the country and sub-regional levels for implementation of ratified protocols; to speed up the adoption of an acceptable and effective common regional currency; to promote more interaction among the peoples for cross cultural awareness; the establishment of a regional security network to stem the tide of crime in the region and to enhance free flow of cross-border trade.


For these solutions to be realized a sub-regional pressure/advocacy group needs to be constituted to advocate for the implementation of these proposed solutions and to lobby governments to be more responsive to the needs of the people.



Nonetheless, participants drew up an action plan which will facilitate dialogue and communication among the various stakeholders. This will however also need to be fine tuned for practicality and a realistic frame for achievements.



Challenges/Problems

Recommended Solutions

Responsibility

Time Frame

Means of Verification

Lack of collaboration between the various stakeholders and security services.

Establishment of a sub-regional consultation network among the private sector, police, customs, immigration service, and professional bodies for dialogue.

ICA / ROWA

CLUSA / CILSS

1 Year

Minutes of the constituent General Assembly


Insufficient training, information and knowledge of rules and standards


Training of all stakeholders especially cooperatives - Organizing regional workshops to enhance stakeholders’ knowledge of rules and regulations on movement of goods and persons in sub-regional countries.


ICA / ROWA, CLUSA, CILSS

3 Years

Training reports

Difficulties in accessing funding for the productions, processing and marketing of agricultural products.

Establishment of a guarantee fund in the member states through cooperatives and economic interest groups. ICA to write a proposal on how it should work and be managed.

Cooperatives, private operators, other socio-professional organisations-NGOs

2 Years

Bank account opened and credited

Insufficient and adaptable infrastructure and equipment for production, processing and marketing.

Improvement of inter regional infrastructure (rail ways, roads, harbours/ports, communication facilities)

ECOWAS, NEPAD, States, CILSS

5 Years

Report of state of infrastructure

Lack of dialogue framework between economic operators (Cooperatives and small traders) and institutional operators

Ensure the respect of rules through dialogue. Civil Society and pressure groups to initiate the dialogue with the appropriate institutions. Government to disseminate decision reached in various commissions.

States, social partners (NGOS, Pressure groups, and other Civil Society Organizations), cooperatives, economic operators, CNC, other socio-professional organisations

All the time

Reports of CNC

Reports of CRC

Absence of regional trade information system

Networking/Computerising the activities of the sub-regional bodies; trade information made widely available 10





ICA / ROWA, CLUSA, CILSS, Stakeholders; ECOWAS.





2 Years

Reports of operational trials

Absence of regional trade information systems and market opportunities.

Establishment of an inter African Cooperative Commodity Exchange

ICA / ROWA, CLUSA, CILSS, Stakeholders

1 ½

Years

Report of constituent general assemblies

Difficulty in accessing means of transportations. High cost of transportation,

Facilitating in transportation (i.e. road, rail, maritime) by providing enough information and establishing common charges and fees.

ECOWAS, States (Regional Cooperation and Transport departments)

All the time

Reports of CRC and CNC

Poor organisation of economic operators.

Strengthening the capacities of the economic operators and small businesses in trade information exchange and networking.

ICA / ROWA, CLUSA, CILSS

3 Years

Training reports,

Reports of meetings

Lacks of favourable regulations for only sub-regional inter-state trade.

Formulation and adoption of favourable regulations for inter state trade to be distinct from global trade.


ECOWAS

2 Years

ECOWAS Texts

Protocols

Lack of framework for dialogue between economic and institutional operators.

Dialoguing at the local and regional level



Stakeholders (cooperatives)

Partners (ECOWAS, ICA, ROWA, CLUSA, CILSS)

All the time

Reports on consultations

Lack of respect for regional texts and legal instruments

Respect of Agreements by member states

ECOWAS, States-Ministries of Justice, Cooperation and Interior.

All the time

Conclusions of Heads of State summit meetings

Language barrier

Dissemination of information in French and English languages

ECOWAS, States, ICA, ROWA, CLUSA

All the time

Documents produced

Diversity in currencies in the sub-region. This poses enormous difficulties in convertibility.

Acceleration of the creation of the regional currency

ECOWAS, States-Ministries of Economy, Cooperation, Commerce; WAMI.

10 Years

Issue of currency

Lack of networking opportunities

Promotion and participation in ECOWAS trade fairs.

ECOWAS, Chambers of Commerce, Exchange

Periodic

Report on trade fairs


C. DEVELOPING A PRAGMATIC FRAMEWORK FOR BUILDING ALLIANCES, NETWORKS, ADVOCACY PLANS AND MOVEMENTS TO FACILITATE INTEGRATION AND CROSS BORDER TRADE


Mr. Igor VIDEROT of Sub-Saharan Sales, a small private business involved in the export and marketing of agricultural produce synthesised some of the constraints and effectively built up the case for using the African Inter Cooperative Commodity Exchange (AICCE) as a lasting lobbying tool and an instrument for concrete action to bring about the required change. It is an Exchange for trade in agricultural produce among West African countries1112. He walked participants through the process for building an effective alliance for this purpose as follows:



The presenter challenged participants to identify a promotional network in each country, to choose a coordination and monitoring committee; to establish the main lines of this phase for the promotion and establishment of the AICCE and identify the sources of funding.


In terms of pragmatic framework there was a consensus to start a process for building alliances from the national through to the regional level. The responsibility is on each national group to start their own process and negotiations.




Challenges

Recommended Solutions

Responsibility

Time Frame

Resource Required

Means of Verification



Weak collaboration


Absence of networks at sub-regional level (ECOWAS)


Absence of advocacy groups at regional level. However, existence in each state of pressure groups (Chambers of Commerce, Trade Associations, Producer Organizations)



Absence of formal collaboration within administrative institutions






Absence of an extensive dissemination programme relating to funding, support organizations, etc.




Inefficient information networks (telecommunications, internet, etc.)




Lack of coordination between the various interest groups

Finalizing feasibility study

ICA/CLUSA

31st January, 2005

CLUSA

Human

&

Financial

Resources

Financial Report

Dissemination of workshop results to parties concerned in each country (cooperatives, states) Development, Institutions, CNC, CNOP

All Workshop participants

By end of September,

2004

Apex Organisations,

Human Resource

& Financial Resource

Validation/workshop reports

Dissemination of summary report to the ICA

Participants of the Workshop

Oct

2004

Apex Organisations,

Human Resource

& Financial Resource

Acknowledgement by ICA of recent report

Dissemination of synthesis report to partners

ICA

End of Dec

2004

ICA

Out-going mails register


Promotion and sensitization campaign

ICA/CLUSA

&

Apex Organisations

On-going

Human Resource,

CLUSA,

ICA,

Apex,

ECOWAS,

UEMOA

CILSS

Number of meetings advertised/published


Sensitisation report

Launching the registration of report for subscription


ICA to coordinate all activities.

Legal Entity

&

ICA

End December

Subscribers

And Shareholders

Report of registration fees and list of subscribers


D. A PROCESS FOR TRANSFERRING RESOURCES TO AN EXCHANGE -- THE AFRICAN INTER CO-OPERATIVE COMMODITY EXCHANGE (AICCE)


Ms Eugenie Djibo - Zongo from ICA presented on the historical context, objectives, achievements and challenges in the process of creating the African Inter Cooperative Commodity Exchange, which could be of the most credible and effective tool for the realization of regional economic integration. To this end it was necessary to dedicate resources: human and financial for the realization of the vision.


The priorities of International Cooperative Alliance West African Regional Office (ICA/WARO) is to promote institutional emergence and consolidate the process of cooperatives, the development of human resources, gender promotion, poverty alleviation, support for reforms of co-operative policies legislations and inter-co-operative trade.


The idea of the exchange was born from the desire of ICA/WARO member organisations to develop trade among themselves, notably through trade in agricultural products. An exploratory study was conducted to propose a collection and implementation schemes for an Inter cooperative trade network, an information exchange on the possibilities and opportunities of domestic markets within the sub-region and the outside world.


The objectives of the exchange are:



Its vision is to find an effective way of improving the fluidity and volume of trade in agricultural products among African countries. However, it is important to mention that AICCE is a proposed initiative taken at the sub-regional level but which will eventually be proposed for the whole of Africa. In the southern part of Africa negotiations are underway to create the similar initiative. It is anticipated that the two organizations will merge into a single Inter-Cooperative Exchange for the whole continent.



Participants were charged to finalize the work plan from the Dakar workshop (Annex 2), which centred on the programme for the establishment of the AICCE, and propose a location for its headquarters. In effect the Ghana workshop was an opportunity to come out with concrete and practical proposals to move the process of establishing the Exchange forward.








VII. IMMEDIATE FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS



Mr Prempeh, General Secretary of the Ghana Cooperatives Council met with presidents and other representatives of cooperatives, business operators and farmers organizations present at the workshop and those who participated in the Dakar Workshop to discuss how they can speed up the implementation process of the recommendations and action plan proposed by participants.


Cooperatives leaders admitted that the action plan agreed on in Dakar (see annex) has hashas not yet been executed because those in charge of the implementation do not have financial and human means. They affirmed that CLUSA could have helped to put the action plan into practical implementation if these had been ready. Participants agreed that this workshop was like a continuation of what was done in Dakar with the expansion of membership from representatives of six countries to 12 countries.


They agreed that the actions plans of Dakar and Accra should be reconciled and moved straight ahead to implementation if the AICCE is to be in existence by January 2005.















Activity

Responsibility

Time Frame

Means of Verification

Finalize the workshop report

Organising Committee13

One Month

Presented Report

National Dissemination of documents and workshop outcomes

Follow-up committee,

ICA

&

Participants

August 2004

To

January 2005

Report Submission

Formulation of model for promotion campaign/exchange

Organising Committee

August 2004

To

January 2005

Availability of the model

Dissemination of model


All stakeholders

1st Quarter of 2005

Publication in the print media, radio, TV, flyers, handouts,

Lobbying the NGO’s, ECOWAS, UEMOA, CILSS, BOAD, ADB

Organising Committee

June 2005

Signing of convention

Launching and registration of subscription

Organising Committee

3rd Quarter of 2005

Payment of subscription

Establishment of African Inter-cooperative Commodity Exchange,

Organising Committee

&

Representatives of various stakeholders

4th Quarter of 2005

Minutes of Annual meetings




  1. POST WORKSHOP ANALYSIS



























































  1. ANNEXES





























Annex 1


ECOWAS PROTOCOLS



A. FREE MOVEMENT OF PERSONS:


Within the framework of the free movement of persons, the Executive Secretariat of ECOWAS has adopted a number of legal instruments, which are presented below.

  1. Protocol A/P.1/5/79 defines the general principles of movement of persons, Right of Residence and Establishment. It stipulates that “citizens of the community have the right of entry, residence and establishment and member states undertake to grant these rights to the citizens of the community in their respective territories”

  2. ii) Protocol A/SPI/7/86; the second stage grants to citizens of the Community in other member states, the right of residence in its territory in order to undertake salaried activity and engage in it. In accordance with articles 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the said protocol, the right of residence, health and right to work in member states.


  1. Protocol A/SP2/5/90; the “right of establishment” is a right granted a citizen of a member state, to settle or to establish himself in a member state, to undertake and engage in economic activities, as well as to establish and manage enterprises particularly companies.


  1. Protocol A/SP1/7/85 on the Code of Conduct for the application of the protocol on the Free Movement of Persons, Right of Residence and Establishment


  1. Protocol A/P3/5/82 on the Code of Citizenship of the Community stipulates that Citizenship of the Community is acquired either by descent, place of birth, adoption or naturalisation under certain conditions contained in the protocol.


  1. Decision 2/7/85 on the Institution of a travel document for ECOWAS Member States; which is in the form of a booklet containing essential details of the traveller, issuing authority and the place of issue.


  1. Decision A/dec 2/5/90 on the institution of a residence card of ECOWAS member states this instituted by the “Residence Card” of ECOWAS member states. This is to enable members reside in member states.

  1. Decision C /Dec 3 /12 /92 relating to the institution of a Harmonisation Formula for Immigration and Migrant of ECOWAS member states


  1. The last Conference of Heads of State and Government, held in Abuja on 28th and 29th May 2000, created the ECOWAS passport to facilitate free movement of goods and persons.


  1. ECOWAS has made the application of the free movement of persons one of its priority programmes, which undertakes information and sensitisation activities of all intervening parties at all levels within the sub region.


B. PROTOCOLS ON TRADE


    1. Protocol on free movement of goods and services.

This protocol is normally referred to as the ECOWAS Trade Liberalisation Scheme (ETLS). It was launched in 1990 with the aim of removing all tariff and non-tariff barriers to intra-regional trade.

Under the ETLS Protocol, all approved and listed products are to be tax-exempt as long as they satisfy the conditions of acceptance for goods originating within the Community.

Specifically, the goods must:

  1. Be produced from materials of community origin whose value is equal to or higher than 40% of the total cost of the raw material employed in their production or whose quantity is equal to or higher than 60% of the total cost of all raw materials employed:


  1. Be produced from materials of foreign or indeterminate origin whose CIF value does not exceed 60% of the total cost of materials employed.


  1. Have received in the process of production a value added of at least 30% of ex-factory price before tax.





    1. Inter-State Road Transit convention (ISRT).



The ISRT Convention is a regime that allows the transportation of goods by road from one Member State to another Member State through one or more Member States free of duties, taxes and restrictions while in transit. The goods are to be accompanied by a set of customs documents and are not to be off-loaded or transferred while in transit.


Exporters of cargo on transit are required to produce the following:






























Annex 2


Dakar Action Plan 2003

ACTIVITIES

TIME FRAME (2004)

RESPONSIBLE

FINANCIAL RESOURCES

Finalization of workshop report. Final document of feasibility study.

Ending January

ICA-ROWA

ICA-ROWA

Dissemination of workshop outcomes to Cooperatives, governments and stakeholders. Work coordinated by ICA.

First term

Participants

ICA Stakeholders organizations

ICA in collaboration with stakeholders at the national level and international

Transmission of restitution report to ICA

2nd term (latest by 15th April)

Participants

ICA Stakeholders organizations

Participants

ICA Stakeholders organizations

Transmission of the synthesis report to stakeholders and to potential partners

2nd term

ICA

ICA

Promotion and awareness campaign

From 2nd to 3rd term

Participants

ICA Stakeholders organizations,

Partners

Sponsors

Participants

ICA Stakeholders organizations,

Partners

Sponsors

Launching and registration of subscription intentions.

3rd term

ICA

ICA

Partners

Establishment of AICCE

4th term

Shareholders.

Shareholders

Annex 3


Participants list





NO.

NAME

DESIGNATION

ADDRESS/TEL

TEL. / FAX / EMAIL

COUNTRY

1

Erasme M. WHANNOU

Cooperative Beninois de Material Agricole COBEMAG, Parakou

BP 161 Panakou - Benin

00229 610848/0558 Cell: 00229 9 33483 EMAIL: cobemag@intnet.bj

BENIN

2

Adrien K. AKPO

Federation des Caisses d’Epargne et de Credit Agricole Mutuel du Benin FECECAM

FECECAM-BENIN

Tel: (00229) 36 16 52Fax:((00229) 36 15 05Cel: (00229) 03 26 73Email:adrienakpo2000@yahoo.fr; fececam@intnet.bf

BENIN

3

Mahamoud SOBGO

Union des Cooperatives Agricoles et Naraicheries du Burkina (UCOBAM)

01 BP : 277

Ouagadougou 01

Tel: 00226 50306527/50314017 Fax: 00226 50306528 Email: ucobam@zcp.bf

BURKINA FASO

4

TRAORE P Albert

Inspecteur Divisionnaire des Douanes

BP.506-Ouagadougou

Tél (00226) 50 32 47 56/ 50 32 47 57Fax: 00226 50311204Email: alikok12@yahoo.fr

BURKINA FASO

5

Francois GUIRA

Service d' Appui Conseil aux Cooperative Artisannales membres de L' Union des Cooperative Artisannale de Burkina ( SACCA - CICOPA)

01BP 1676 OUAGA

Tel: 0022650315875 sacca@fasonet.bf

BURKINA FASO

6

Ms Zongo Eugenie DJIBO

Alliance Cooperative Internationale (ACI) Bureau Regional Pour L' Afrique de L' Ouest(BRAO)

01 BP 6461-Ouagadougou 01Burkina Faso

Tél:226-50 30 73 28 /Fax:226-30 73 29E-mail:acibrao@fasonet.bf

BURKINA FASO

7

ADOU KOMAN

TRADE DEPARTMENT, ECOWAS/CEDEAO

60, Yakubu Gowon Crescent, Asokoro District P. M. B. 401 Abuja, Nigeria

00 234 9 314 76 38 EMAIL: akoman@ecowasmail.net; aksylvere@yahoo.fr

BURKINA FASO

8

Monsieur Tidjane BARRY

Union National de Exportation Betail du Burkina Faso

02 BP. 5713OUAGADOUGOU 02

Tél. (00226) 35 72 76/ 23 10 65/Fax:35 72 08Cell: 00226 70 23 10 65Email:barrytidjane@yahoo.fr

BURKINA FASO

9

JOSE Luis BARBOSA

FENACOOP

BP 416 PRAIACAP VERT

Tel: 00238 2633883Cel: 00238 9917024Fax: 00238 2634011Email: fenacoop@cvtelecom.cv

CAP VERT

10

Commandant Kouassi ALIKO

Direction Générale des Douanes

BP. V 25 Abidjan

Tél. (00225) 2025 1500Cell: (00225) 07 09 14 21Fax: (00225) 2022 0568Email: cynthisaac@hotmail.com

COTE D'IVOIRE

11

N’DORY Achy Jean

Organisation Bourse Café Cacao

04 BP. 2576 Abidjan 04

Tel: (225) 2020 2741Cel: 225 05919123Fax: 225 2020 2993Email: ndouga@bcc.ci

COTE D'IVOIRE

12

OUATTARA Mamadou

Formation et l’Appui Cooperatif -Directeur

URECOS-CI BP 635 Korhogo-Cote d’Ivoire

Tel: 225 3686 0003/3686 1380Cel: 225 0591 2221Fax: 225 3686 0013Email: c/o diarrangolo@yahoo.fr

COTE D'IVOIRE

13

Elhaji Sékou TOURE

CNC / FEDESREVI

09 BP. 1931 Abidjan 09

Tél. (00225) 22 47 05 05Fax (00225) 20214016Cell:00 225 22474046Email:tacle@africaonline.co.ci sektourek@yahoo.fr

COTE D'IVOIRE

14

LOKPO Bougouhi

Société des cooperatives AgricolesD’Agboville (SCAGBO)

BP 717-Agboville(Côte d’Ivoire)

Tél.: 225 2354 74 50Fax:00225 23 54 71 50Email:scagbo@africaonline.co.ci

COTE D'IVOIRE

15

Mr. Yahya JARJUSEY

Federation of Agricultural Cooperatives Societies Ltd

 

Tel: (00220) 4228186/5531005Fax: (00220) 4227504 Email: facs@qanet.gm

GAMBIA

16

Emmanuel ABELIWINE

Market Access Promotion Network Ghana MAPRONET - Ghana

P O Box TL 1773 Tamale

Tel: 071 26045/0244 299414 / abeliwine@yahoo.com

GHANA

17

Miss Lydia DONKOR

Legal Directorate - G.P.S.

Ghana Police HQRS. P.O. Box 116, Accra

Tel: 0244 737707

GHANA

18

Pape SENE

CLUSA

H2 Regimanuel Estates DTD Nungua Barrier – Sakumono

Tel: 021 7211247/716771Fax: 021 716772Email: psene@ghana.com

GHANA

19

John K. KUDALOR

Ghana Police MIU

P. O. Box 116, Accra

Tel:233-21-761277/233-24- 4737707, 233-21-775060 e-mail jkukdalor@Yahoo com

GHANA

20

Lawrencia ADAMS (Ms)

Pan African Organization for Sustainable Development (POSDEV)

E037 Anevon CourtDTD Com 15Lashibi

Tel: 00233 22 404517/404518 402371Email:posdev@ghana.com

GHANA

21

Frank S. KWOFIE

Interpol/Ghana

CID HQTRS., P. O. Box 505, Accra

Tel: 00233 21 775060/0244 256191Email: fkwofie@yahoo.com

GHANA

22

Mrs. Comfort OSAFO

Ghana Customs Excise and Preventive Service (CEPS)

P. O. Box 68Accra

Tel: 00233 21 662935Fax: 021 662935 – Cell: 0244316276

GHANA

23

Albert PREMPEH

Ghana Cooperative Council (GCC)

P. O. Box GP 4034Accra G11

Tel: 000233 21 686254/686253 Cell: 244 267014Email:ghacoco@ghana.coalbprempeh@yahoo.com

GHANA

24

Judith M. DZOKOTO

SC. OFFICER (AFRICA DESK)

GIS, PMB, MINISTRIES, ACCRA

00233 244-268117

GHANA

25

Mr. Abass SIDIKI

WAMI -GHANA

PMB. CT. 75Accra,

Tel: 00223 21 676901/2Fax: 000233 21 676903Email: info@wami-imao.org

GHANA

26

James ANEWENAH

SNV

6 Mankata Close, Aiport Res. Area, Accra

00233(0)21 772858 / 774782 email: janewenah@snvghana.org

GHANA

27

Mr. Stephen Opong

Ministry For Regional Cooperation and NEPAD

Ministries - Accra

Tel: 00233 21 76131 (Chief Director )

GHANA

28

Dramane COULIBALY

Reportable PNPGA CILSS

B.P 7069 OUGADOUGOU

00226 216 37626 / 33 Fax: 00226 374132 Email: coulibaly@cilss.br; cou1150@yahoo.fr

BURKINA FASO

29

E.O. ASHLEY

Cooperative Transport Assc. - Ghana

P. O. Box GP 4034 Accra G11

Tel: 00233 21 686254/2322195Email:ghacoco@ghana.com

GHANA

30

Alhaji Abdul-Wahab ABDULAI

Private Road Transport Owners Association (PROTOA)

Opposite Victory HotelNeoplan StationAccra

020-8132809

GHANA

31

Alhaji Prince Issifu DANTANKWA

Ghana Cooperative Butchers Assoc

P. O. Box 2100 MPAccra - Central

Tel: 231666153 Cell: 0244 168065Fax: 021 666153

GHANA

32

Owusu A.A Président (Dr)

National Consultative Committee GHANA

ASTEK P.O. Box 4710Accra-Ghana

Tél (00233-24) 25 03 21 E-mail: astek@ghana.com

GHANA

33

MARFO-YIADOM Boakye (Mr.)

Agricultural Cooperatives - Ghana

P. O. Box GP 4034Accra G11

Tel: 00233 21 686254/2322195 Cell: 233 27 7792407 Email:ghacoco@ghana.com

GHANA

34

Ms Judith Mawunyo

Ghana Immigration Service (Head Office)

Sankara CircleP. M. B Airport

Tel: 021 25321/665874/258250/ 0244 256187Fax: Fax: 021258249

GHANA

35

Aba SMITH (Mrs)

Ghana Cooperative Council

GCC, P.O. BOX 4034, ACCRA P. O. Box GP 4034Accra G11

Tel: 00233 20 8138537/233 21 686253 Email: ghacoco@ghana.com

GHANA

36

El Hadj NOBA

Cadre National de Concertation (CNC) Guinee

BP 6693

Tel: 00224 218796/451233

GUINEE

37

Ms Soumah Fatoumata CAMARA

Cadre National de concertation (CNC)

BP 6693CONAKRYGuinee

Tel: (00224) 46 45 71/ 262074(224) 011-22-10-76

GUINEE

38

Monsieur Aly Theoury CAMARA

CNOP-G Conseil National des Organisation Paysannes de Guinee (OPA/DAOP/MAE)

C/O PROMOPA BP. 576CONAKRY-RÉP. DE GUINÉE

Tel: (00224) 13351030/00224 013 351030E-mail: jlveaux@wanadoo.fr

GUINEE

39

Monsieur Sidiki CAMARA

Cooperative de producteurs de Café-Cacao – WOKO duCNOP-G

C/O PROMOPA BP. 570CONAKRY-RÉP. DE GUINÉE

Tel: (00224) 13351030/00224 013 351030E-mail: jlveaux@wanadoo.fr

GUINEE

40

Almany TOURE

Direction Generale des Douanes (D. G. A)

BP. 269Douanes de Mali

Tel: 00223 2205774 Tel/Fax: 00223 2205561Cel: 00223 6783236

MALI

41

Soumaila SEYNI

Confédération Nationale des CONACOOP.

CONACOOPB.P: 296-Niamey (Niger)

TEL: 00227 734448 EMAIL: soumaila@yahoo.fr

NIGER

42

Dr. Samson S. OLALERE

Cooperative Dev. Res. Action Centre (CODERAC)

37, Akunleyan Office Complex Opposite Green Springs Hotel, Old Ife Road Ibadan, Oyo State Nigeria

Tel: 234 2 8108375Cell: 080 23451808 Fax: 00234 28109051 Email: coderac@infoweb.abs.net

NIGERIA

43

Mr. Adou KOMAN

ECOWAS - ABUJA

60, Yakubu Gowon Crescent, Asokoro District P. M. B. 401 Abuja, Nigeria

Tel: (234)(9)3147647 – 9/00234 9 3147638Fax: (2334) 9 3147646/3143005/3143005Email: aksylvere@yahoo.fr; akoman@ecowasmail.net

NIGERIA

44

Mrs. Saude GARBA OLAWALE

Women Farmers Advancement Network (WOFAN)

Plot 18, Yahaya Gusau Road, NNDC Quarters Kano State, Nigeria

Tel: 234 64 662199/665487Cell: 08023095811Fax: 00234 662199/64 665487Email: wofan@ecnx.net wofan@mega.bw

NIGERIA

45

Ali Mohammed RIMIN DAKO

SECRETARY-GENERAL

C/O WOFANKANO

Tel: 00234 Fax:00 234 64 636492Email: wofangroup@yahoo.com

NIGERIA

46

DEME Ibrahima

Union National des Cooperatives Agricole du Senegal

BP 3225 - Dakar

Tel: 221 – 8259138Fax: 221 8259132Email: uncas@sentoo.sn

SENEGAL

47

Igor VIDEROT

Directeur Sub Sahara SaleS

4, rue Parent – B. P 7376 Dakar - Senegal

Tel: (221) 8233684Fax: (221) 8233688Email: sss@arc.sn

SENEGAL

48

CISSE Amsatou Tchiaw

Union National des Cooperatives Agricole du Senegal Comite Femmes

BP 3225 - Dakar

Tel: 221 – 8259138Fax: 221 8259132Cell: 00221 6826218Email:thiawamsatou@yahoo.fr

SENEGAL

49

Mon. Mamadou Dit Doudou FALL

President CNCS

BP. 1153 DAKAR - Senegal

Tel: 00221 8547202/6583595 Fax: 00221 8349510/8236030/8254415 Email: ecsalion@hotmail.com

SENEGAL

50

Monsieur ALASSANI Alidou

Cadre National de Concertation (CNC)

BP. 4140LOME-Togo

Tél. (00228) 250 59 49/9035383Fax (00228) 2216033 Email: hounk122@yahoo.frcebv@bibway.com

TOGO

51

Bernard Joe APPEAH Facilitator

Pentax Managemrnt Consultancy Services Ltd

P. O. Box 1162, Achimota, Accra

Tel: 00233 21 253813/ 253560 Tel/fax 00233 21 253559 Cell: 00233 24 471740 Email: pentaxncs@ghana.com

GHANA

52

Fahd ADAMS

Global Aid Agency

P. O. Box GP 505 Accra

Cell: 00233 27 7499098

GHANA

53

Issa AMARTEY

Livestock Breeders & Traders Asso.

P. O. Box 258 Ashaiman, Accra

00233 22 305927 Cell: 00233 24 4699209 Email: amarssa@yahoo.com

GHANA

54

Issa IDDRISU BELLO

Ghana Cooperative Butchers Assoc

P. O. Box 2100 MPAccra - Central

Tel: 231666153 Cell: 0244 168065Fax: 021 666153

GHANA













































































1 ECOWAS: Economic Community for West Africa States. Member countries are Nigeria, Gambia, Guinea- Bissau, Guinea- Conakry, Sao Tome, Niger, Burkina Faso, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Togo, Benin, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Liberia, Cape Verde, Ghana

2 Business operators: Traders, private companies including cooperatives, small and medium companies, petty traders involved in buying and selling of agricultural produce and other manufactured products.


3 Non-tariff barriers: barriers, check points, roadblocks that are not mainly for tariffs. Example: barriers mounted for security reasons or public order, police and immigration checkpoints.

4 Established in Ghana at the end of 2004 at the Ministry of Regional Cooperation and NEPAD


5

6ECOWAS Community Court was set up and inaugurated in Abuja, Nigeria in November 2004. It will deal with cases related to smuggling and human trafficking and other kinds of cross boarder crime in the West Africa sub-region.

7 Legal Provision:

8 Follow-up committee: Committee made up of leaders of cooperatives, present in Cross-boarder trade workshop in Accra, to ensure the follow up for the establishment of AICCE.

9 Economic Operator: anyone engaged in an economic enterprise usually on a small scale.

10 The MISTOWA (Market Information Systems and Traders’ Organisations in West Africa ) project launched in Accra, Ghana in February 2005. Aims at increasing efficiency of regional market information systems and services and improving West African Regional Trade. 4 year project sponsored by USAID/WARP with the International Centre for Soil Fertility and Agricultural Development (IFDC) as implementing agent. Priority one countries are Benin, Burkina Faso, Masli, Nigeria and Senegal with Togo, the Gambia, Guinea, Niger and Cote d’Ivoire as priority two countries.

11 AICCE: it is an initiative taken by West Africa office of the International Cooperative Alliance. In southern Africa negotiations are underway to create a similar initiative. It is anticipated that the two initiatives could merge eventually into a common Inter-Cooperative Exchange for the whole Africa.


12

13 Organizing committee: ICA/ROWA, CLUSA and representatives of Cooperative councils from each country represented during this workshop.